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Crayon Resists & Vintage Sheet Quilt

I read about another type of collage paper to make.  It sounded like fun, so I gave it a try.  (At some point I need to actually do some collage… But making the paper is fun in its own right!)

Making Wax-Resist Paper is Simple!

Start with paper, some crayons, and a textured surface. 

Paper:
I used scraps I had on hand, mostly about the thickness of typical copier or printer paper.  Thicker paper, like cardstock, may not take the texture as well, but paper that’s too thin may be prone to ripping.  Experiment with what you have!

Textures:
You can use found textures, texture sheets/plates, or stencils.  I had some stencils and plastic texture sheets on hand, so that’s what I used.

Crayons/Wax:
As for the crayons, some say that beeswax works best, but I just used some cheapo crayons we had in the house (didn’t want to ruin my “nice” Crayolas, but I might do it, eventually).  Some of them worked better than others, so if one type doesn’t work, try something else.)  If you prefer, you can also try using a candle instead of a crayon.  

Rub-a-Dub-Dub!

(You probably did this as a kid, at some point, in arts & crafts.  Or maybe you had one of those Fashion Plates toys where you mix and match outfits, then choose the pattern/texture and color for each piece.) 

Place your paper over your textured surface, select a crayon, and rub it over the paper to catch the pattern.  

Most people peel the paper off the crayon and use the whole side of the crayon. 

As for what colors to use, choose a contrasting color or value to the overall color you want your finished paper to be.  So if you want darker paper, use a lighter crayon, or if you want pastel paper, use a darker crayon.  You can use more than one color of crayon per sheet, too.  

I made a bunch of these rubbings at one time before moving to the next step.

Now for the FUN Part...

(Or at least this was my favorite part!)

Working on a protected surface (because it can get a little messy), take any old, largish paintbrush and some thinnish acrylic paint.  I added a tiny bit of water to my crafts paints in an old yogurt cup, but for some paint, using straight from the bottle might work.  Experiment to see what works for you!

Put a wash of paint over the crayon-resist papers.  The crayons or other wax should resist the water in the acrylic paint, shining through in neat and interesting ways.  If you want, you can go back and add more washes of paint, use more than one color of paint on a single page, vary the thickness of the application of paint, etc.  

My results weren’t all perfect, but they were fun to make, and you quickly learn what works and what doesn’t.  

Vintage Sheet Quilt Update!

I finally cut the vintage sheets to make the king-size quilt for our bed!  

You know how with some projects you just can’t seem to stop dragging your feet?  This is one of those, for me.  It’s due to a few different things (life stresses, summertime mood-slump, dread of learning new techniques, etc.), but ultimately, I just don’t feel like working on this.  However, I DO want to get this quilt off my to-do list, so I’ve been forcing myself to work on it, anyway, a bit at a time.

I cut the fabric into 9-inch squares—180 of them:

Some of the fabrics are very pretty and cute, while others are merely so-so, but having a variety will keep it more interesting.  

After getting all the squares cut, I pulled groups of nine and started sewing them together with a 3/8″ seam allowance.  (I’ve seen that recommended, when working with vintage sheets.)

Here are a few of them on the design wall:

After about this point, I decided to keep the finished nine-patches elsewhere, because they couldn’t all fit on the wall, anyway. 

I still have about half of them to sew, and then it will be time to start making quilt sandwiches and quilting them.  The only problem is that there’s already a quilt on the frame, so I need to finish that, first.  

I could try quilting them on the Juki, but I’d rather keep the basting effort to a minimum, so probably won’t.  

Updates coming when there’s something new to say!

A New Quilt Project?

As a carrot to encourage the vintage sheet quilt along, I allowed myself to take a break and gather up strings for my next quilt project, “Cherry Crunch” by Bonnie Hunter. 

I may even start working on it before the sheet quilt is done.  Depends on how I feel!

There are no photos, yet, but if there were, it would just be a few bags of “wild neutral” strips of fabric, along with a handful of pieces on stand-by as possible supplements to the string stash.  

Rough Weather

Our weather this June has been kind of crazy.  Right now, we’re under some sort of heat advisory.  (Ugh.  How many more months until autumn?  I think it’s nearly time to retreat into my fantasy always-autumn world again…)

A week or two ago, however, our area was experiencing some rough weather.  There were tornadoes not too far away (not big ones, but still!), and the sky looked beautifully ominous…

I’m not a fan of too-close lightning, and I used to have recurring nightmares about tornadoes (and tidal waves), but I love to look at grey storm clouds, and wildly windy days (or nights) make me feel alive!  (Not hurricane wind, though… That’s different; it fills my stomach with dread.)

Recent Listening...

Finished The Writing Retreat, and… Well, let’s just say it wasn’t for me. 

Since, I’ve caught up on the latest season of the Uncanny podcast and just barely started listing to a new (non-fiction) book, The New Evil: Understanding the Emergence of Modern Violent Crime, by Michael H. Stone and Gary Brucato.  We’ll see how that goes!

For music, I came across these two pieces in a gel print demonstration video and thought they were beautiful…

“Departure”, from Alice in Winter:

“Stroll the Westbury”, from Moments:

Welcome!

I’m Michael (a female Michael, to remove any doubt).  I live on the Alabama Gulf Coast with my husband, Donald, and our crazy American Eskimo Dogs. 

I love to fill my spare time with various crafts and other hobbies, and this blog is where I share photos, record my progress, and ramble endlessly.

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